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Bus Rides

Today I spent about seven hours on buses with students. The first trip involved 49 students on a trip to Central Michigan University, and the second was to chaperone a spirit bus for a basketball game.

The ride to CMU was lively. Students were awake, engaged in conversation up and down the aisles. For some students, like the one I sat next to on the bus, this was his very first college visit--ever. For others, this was a return trip. They were hoping to finalize a decision about their next few years.

After a tour around campus and lunch in a dining hall, we piled back on the bus. And before long, a tranquil silence took over. Students drifted off to sleep or just experienced a calm contentment with the day. Some questions were answered, and some new ones were developed. A powerful trip ended in quiet reflection.

I write this surrounded by students on the return trip from a basketball game where our team just won.

It's been a long time since our team has made it this far. It's 9:00 PM. I expected a similar bus ride, but students are alive with energy. They're singing. They're chanting. They have so much pride.

As a teacher, it's so motivating to see students so proud of their school and their peers. I’m looking forward to this energy, this enthusiasm, reverberating down the halls tomorrow.

Go, Zebras!

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