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Reconnecting Readers

Our school's open house was just last week. As usual, I met many more of my ninth-grade students than tenth-grade ones. As student after student walked into my classroom, most of them commented on the books that span my walls. And in my usual fashion, I asked each student about his or her reading lives.

Too many of them expressed their dislike of reading. When I talked about how I try to balance time for students to read what they want and what I want, parents seemed excited. But far too many students asked me about "points," "quizzes," and "word counts."

Is this what reading has become? Do real readers read because of extrinsic motivation and/or punishment? Do they read because they have to, or do they read because they want to?

I'm looking forward to helping these student-readers see that readers read because they have an intrinsic motivation. They're yearning to find out what happens next to a character; they have a question that's pertinent to their lives that they just need answered; or they need a safe place to "travel" to because their current situations don't exactly count as accepting.

I ended many conversations that night by asking students to be open and willing, promising their parents that I will work effortlessly to find their student a book they will love.

I am so excited for this school year.

Comments

  1. tổng hơp cách trị bệnh trào ngược dạ dày bằng phương pháp trong nhân gian hiệu quả. Ngoài ra, bạn có thể tham khảo những loại thuốc thuốc chữa trào ngược dạ dày thực quản của chúng tôi. Chắc chắn sẽ mang lại cho bạn những sự hài lòng nhất.
    Lắp đặt cửa tự động hiện nay đang được nhiều người quan tâm. Tìm hiểu chi tiết về Barie là gì. Thuận phát chuyên cung cấp các loại của tự động tốt nhất, xem danh sách báo giá cửa kính tự động của chúng tôi tại đây nhé.

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