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Ten Quotes Worth Considering

I saw Kelly Gallagher (@KellyGToGo) tweet out his top ten quotes from the National Council of Teachers of English's Fall Convention, so I thought I would do something similar. Here are ten golden lines that I know I will be thinking about in the months ahead:

"Our voices are more powerful when we're together." - Beth Shaum (@BethShaum)
"We engage in the fantasy that there will be an audience someday."  -Brian Sweeney
"Evaluation stops the learning. It sorts kids." -Penny Kittle (@PennyKittle)
"School is a place where young people go to watch old people work." -Jeff Wilhelm (@ReadDRjwilhelm)
"We need to change the language that we use to identify our readers." -Kwame Alexander (@kwamealexander)
"They're out babies and we love them." -Ernest Morrell (@ernestmorrell)
"Teach like our lives depend on it because too often their lives will." -David E. Kirkland (@davidekirkland)
"Just because we invite and they're there doesn't mean they're engaged." -Kathy Collins (@KathyCollins15)
"We don't know unless we open the door wide enough." -Vicki Vinton (@VickiVintonTMAP)
"As English teachers, you have power. We are the only [class] where the kids can write their feelings." -Sharon Draper (@sharonmdraper) 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Comments

  1. If you do something that you're not genuinely passionate about, it is a little soul-crushing.
    Just not worth it. See the link below for more info.


    #worth
    www.ufgop.org

    ReplyDelete

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