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The Law That Started It All

After DeVos' hearing yesterday, I continued doing research about the secretary of education. And I stumbled upon the law that actually created the department here.

I've taken the liberty to bold some parts below:

  • SEC. 102. The Congress declares that the establishment of a Department of Education is in the public interest, will promote the general welfare of the United States, will help ensure that education issues receive proper treatment at the Federal level, and will enable the Federal Government to coordinate its education activities more effectively. Therefore, the purposes of this Act are--
    • (1) to strengthen the Federal commitment to ensuring access to equal educational opportunity for every individual;
    • (4) to promote improvements in the quality and usefulness of education through federally supported research, evaluation, and sharing of information
    • (7) to increase the accountability of Federal education programs to the President, the Congress, and the public. 
Some of the above is in direct contradiction to DeVos' testimony. She struggled to answer questions of accountability fairly and honestly. She refused to admit reality that charters and vouchers do not promote equality opportunity for all students. And she certainly didn't cite any research to support her findings. 

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